Word #48

Cover star – Jim Morrison

Issue 48

February 2007

Word48 001

 

Word shuffle

1) P44– the first of two letters pages. Chris Gittner from Deptford writes to complain about Bobby Gillespie. “Please can you not interview Bobby Gillespie ever again? I cannot bear his cooler-than-thou posturing. Of course Bobby; your favourite record of 2006 is a 1970 live album! Of course, after almost 30 years om tour buses you still watch Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia rather than Zoolander. Here is a 42 year-old man for whom every decision is based on the premise, well, what would Iggy Pop do? Would Iggy het his pies from Gregg’s or Somerfields? Would Iggy get SkyPlus? Would Iggy call his son Wolf or Fox?”

2) P43 – the second page of a double-spread about the recently departed. Ahmet Ertegun, founder of Atlantic Records. “…Ahmet himself was not short of production and songwriting skills, writing Mess Around for Ray Charles under his backward pseudonym ‘A. Nugetre’, and producing Bobby Darin’s hits Splish Splash and Mack The Knife.”

3) P75 – part of a 10 page feature on punk. Jo Callis of The Revillos remembers the early days in the provinces. “You’d see guys with denim jackets that said Status Quo and The Clash, in felt tips, which was quite sweet. And you’d play out in the Borders of Scotlands and there’d be these guys apologising because they ‘didnae have the gear’ ; ‘We’re sorry, we cannae buy it in Castle Douglas.”

4) P40 – an anonymous sound engineer spills some secrets about live music. “Some sounds simply can’t be recreated on stage as they can in a studio. It’s rumoured that U2 have had a full studio underneath the stage since the late 80’s for this very reason. Otherwise, who plays the fast sequenced keyboard part and the keyboard pads on With Or Without You?”

5) P23 – Jarvis is interviewed by Craig McLean. “As far as I can make out, quite a few of the things the G8 promised to do they haven’t actually done…It’s that idea that you can change the system from within. They made a big thing of getting people like Bill Gates on board. It was very much saying, “We can make caring capitalism.” Well, like it says in the song (Running The World) ‘Fuck the morals, does it make any money?’ That is the thing with capitalism. If it makes a profit it’s good. If it doesn’t it’s not good. The way to make a profit is to produce things as cheaply as possible. And one way to produce stuff as cheaply as possible is to pay people fuck-all. That’s what used to happen in Great Britain. But now working class people – for want of a better word – are in a weird situation. They’re not the ones doing the dirty work, it’s people over in… Macau. The people who were traditionally called the working classes are now supposed to buy the stuff that’s made in Macau.”

Interesting – Rob Fitzpatrick interviews Adam & Joe and asks what will happen on TV in 2007. Adam answers “I’m thinking of a huge Samoan lesbian from Manchester called Julie who fronts a show called Have You Fucked My Mum? It’ll be the first show ever to have an expletive in the title that Channel 4 insist is printed without stars in the listings.”

Steve Yates reflects on hip hop’s annus horribilis of 2006. “The most popular rap singles of recent weeks have included such novelty items as Jibb’s Chain Hang Low, a track based on a nursery rhyme, and Webstar’s gimmicky YouTube phenomenon Chicken Noodle Soup. That crunching sound you hear may just be Greg Dyke doing the math on a possible Roland Rat revival.”

Joe Muggs speaks to John Martyn about touring Solid Air. “The wheelchair gets a bit impractical. Thank god my girlfriend is around to help me with all that. There’s no ploughing straight into the most dangerous pub we can find and then on to all-night joints now either – just a drink-up back at the hotel.”

Claudia Brucken writes about her favourite books and music. She likes “I love Patti Smith’s Horses – it’s so influential across so many ages. I first heard it in the early ’80s and was really struck by her punkiness and attitude as a woman. I love Rimbaud too – I think that’s a bit of Patti’s influence. A Season In Hell is really illuminating, it’s something I’ve gone back to over the years and, as my English has got better, I’ve noticed lots of new things in there. It’s just brilliant in the way it questions everything from art and morality to love. Everything conventional is everything odd is challenged and so you are made to really think.”

 

Longer article

David Hepworth looks back on our 50 year love affair with record shops.

Word48 002Word48 003Word48 004Word48 005Word48 006

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s